Canada’s Covid19 analysis based on Logistic Regression

Hi Guys,

Today, I’ll be demonstrating some scenarios based on open-source data from Canada. In this post, I will only explain some of the significant parts of the code. Not the entire range of scripts here.

Let’s explore a couple of sample source data –

2. Sample Input Data

I would like to explore how much this disease caused an impact on the elderly in Canada.

Let’s explore the source directory structure –

3. Source Directory Structures

For this, you need to install the following packages –

pip install pandas

pip install seaborn

Please find the PyPi link given below –

In this case, we’ve downloaded the data from Canada’s site. However, they have created API. So, you can consume the data through that way as well. Since the volume is a little large. I decided to download that in CSV & then use that for my analysis.

Before I start, let me explain a couple of critical assumptions that I had to make due to data impurities or availabilities.

  • If there is no data available for a specific case, my application will consider that patient as COVID-Active.
  • We will consider the patient is affected through Community-spreading until we have data to find it otherwise.
  • If there is no data available for gender, we’re marking these records as “Other.” So, that way, we’re making it into that category, where the patient doesn’t want to disclose their sexual orientation.
  • If we don’t have any data, then by default, the application is considering the patient is alive.
  • Lastly, my application considers the middle point of the age range data for all the categories, i.e., the patient’s age between 20 & 30 will be considered as 25.

1. clsCovidAnalysisByCountryAdv (This is the main script, which will invoke the Machine-Learning API & return 0 if successful.)

##############################################
#### Written By: SATYAKI DE               ####
#### Written On: 01-Jun-2020              ####
#### Modified On 01-Jun-2020              ####
####                                      ####
#### Objective: Main scripts for Logistic ####
#### Regression.                          ####
##############################################

import pandas as p
import clsL as log
import datetime

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns
from clsConfig import clsConfig as cf

# %matplotlib inline -- for Jupyter Notebook
class clsCovidAnalysisByCountryAdv:
    def __init__(self):
        self.fileName_1 = cf.config['FILE_NAME_1']
        self.fileName_2 = cf.config['FILE_NAME_2']
        self.Ind = cf.config['DEBUG_IND']
        self.subdir = str(cf.config['LOG_DIR_NAME'])

    def setDefaultActiveCases(self, row):
        try:
            str_status = str(row['case_status'])

            if str_status == 'Not Reported':
                return 'Active'
            else:
                return str_status
        except:
            return 'Active'

    def setDefaultExposure(self, row):
        try:
            str_exposure = str(row['exposure'])

            if str_exposure == 'Not Reported':
                return 'Community'
            else:
                return str_exposure
        except:
            return 'Community'

    def setGender(self, row):
        try:
            str_gender = str(row['gender'])

            if str_gender == 'Not Reported':
                return 'Other'
            else:
                return str_gender
        except:
            return 'Other'

    def setSurviveStatus(self, row):
        try:
            # 0 - Deceased
            # 1 - Alive
            str_active = str(row['ActiveCases'])

            if str_active == 'Deceased':
                return 0
            else:
                return 1
        except:
            return 1

    def getAgeFromGroup(self, row):
        try:
            # We'll take the middle of the Age group
            # If a age range falls with 20, we'll
            # consider this as 10.
            # Similarly, a age group between 20 & 30,
            # should reflect by 25.
            # Anything above 80 will be considered as
            # 85

            str_age_group = str(row['AgeGroup'])

            if str_age_group == '<20':
                return 10
            elif str_age_group == '20-29':
                return 25
            elif str_age_group == '30-39':
                return 35
            elif str_age_group == '40-49':
                return 45
            elif str_age_group == '50-59':
                return 55
            elif str_age_group == '60-69':
                return 65
            elif str_age_group == '70-79':
                return 75
            else:
                return 85
        except:
            return 100

    def predictResult(self):
        try:
            
            # Initiating Logging Instances
            clog = log.clsL()

            # Important variables
            var = datetime.datetime.now().strftime(".%H.%M.%S")
            print('Target File Extension will contain the following:: ', var)
            Ind = self.Ind
            subdir = self.subdir

            #######################################
            #                                     #
            # Using Logistic Regression to        #
            # Idenitfy the following scenarios -  #
            #                                     #
            # Age wise Infection Vs Deaths        #
            #                                     #
            #######################################
            inputFileName_2 = self.fileName_2

            # Reading from Input File
            df_2 = p.read_csv(inputFileName_2)

            # Fetching only relevant columns
            df_2_Mod = df_2[['date_reported','age_group','gender','exposure','case_status']]
            df_2_Mod['State'] = df_2['province_abbr']

            print()
            print('Projecting 2nd file sample rows: ')
            print(df_2_Mod.head())

            print()
            x_row_1 = df_2_Mod.shape[0]
            x_col_1 = df_2_Mod.shape[1]

            print('Total Number of Rows: ', x_row_1)
            print('Total Number of columns: ', x_col_1)

            #########################################################################################
            # Few Assumptions                                                                       #
            #########################################################################################
            # By default, if there is no data on exposure - We'll treat that as community spreading #
            # By default, if there is no data on case_status - We'll consider this as active        #
            # By default, if there is no data on gender - We'll put that under a separate Gender    #
            # category marked as the "Other". This includes someone who doesn't want to identify    #
            # his/her gender or wants to be part of LGBT community in a generic term.               #
            #                                                                                       #
            # We'll transform our data accordingly based on the above logic.                        #
            #########################################################################################
            df_2_Mod['ActiveCases'] = df_2_Mod.apply(lambda row: self.setDefaultActiveCases(row), axis=1)
            df_2_Mod['ExposureStatus'] = df_2_Mod.apply(lambda row: self.setDefaultExposure(row), axis=1)
            df_2_Mod['Gender'] = df_2_Mod.apply(lambda row: self.setGender(row), axis=1)

            # Filtering all other records where we don't get any relevant information
            # Fetching Data for
            df_3 = df_2_Mod[(df_2_Mod['age_group'] != 'Not Reported')]

            # Dropping unwanted columns
            df_3.drop(columns=['exposure'], inplace=True)
            df_3.drop(columns=['case_status'], inplace=True)
            df_3.drop(columns=['date_reported'], inplace=True)
            df_3.drop(columns=['gender'], inplace=True)

            # Renaming one existing column
            df_3.rename(columns={"age_group": "AgeGroup"}, inplace=True)

            # Creating important feature
            # 0 - Deceased
            # 1 - Alive
            df_3['Survived'] = df_3.apply(lambda row: self.setSurviveStatus(row), axis=1)

            clog.logr('2.df_3' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_3, subdir)

            print()
            print('Projecting Filter sample rows: ')
            print(df_3.head())

            print()
            x_row_2 = df_3.shape[0]
            x_col_2 = df_3.shape[1]

            print('Total Number of Rows: ', x_row_2)
            print('Total Number of columns: ', x_col_2)

            # Let's do some basic checkings
            sns.set_style('whitegrid')
            #sns.countplot(x='Survived', hue='Gender', data=df_3, palette='RdBu_r')

            # Fixing Gender Column
            # This will check & indicate yellow for missing entries
            #sns.heatmap(df_3.isnull(), yticklabels=False, cbar=False, cmap='viridis')

            #sex = p.get_dummies(df_3['Gender'], drop_first=True)
            sex = p.get_dummies(df_3['Gender'])
            df_4 = p.concat([df_3, sex], axis=1)

            print('After New addition of columns: ')
            print(df_4.head())

            clog.logr('3.df_4' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_4, subdir)

            # Dropping unwanted columns for our Machine Learning
            df_4.drop(columns=['Gender'], inplace=True)
            df_4.drop(columns=['ActiveCases'], inplace=True)
            df_4.drop(columns=['Male','Other','Transgender'], inplace=True)

            clog.logr('4.df_4_Mod' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_4, subdir)

            # Fixing Spread Columns
            spread = p.get_dummies(df_4['ExposureStatus'], drop_first=True)
            df_5 = p.concat([df_4, spread], axis=1)

            print('After Spread columns:')
            print(df_5.head())

            clog.logr('5.df_5' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_5, subdir)

            # Dropping unwanted columns for our Machine Learning
            df_5.drop(columns=['ExposureStatus'], inplace=True)

            clog.logr('6.df_5_Mod' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_5, subdir)

            # Fixing Age Columns
            df_5['Age'] = df_5.apply(lambda row: self.getAgeFromGroup(row), axis=1)
            df_5.drop(columns=["AgeGroup"], inplace=True)

            clog.logr('7.df_6' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_5, subdir)

            # Fixing Dummy Columns Name
            # Renaming one existing column Travel-Related with Travel_Related
            df_5.rename(columns={"Travel-Related": "TravelRelated"}, inplace=True)

            clog.logr('8.df_7' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_5, subdir)

            # Removing state for temporary basis
            df_5.drop(columns=['State'], inplace=True)
            # df_5.drop(columns=['State','Other','Transgender','Pending','TravelRelated','Male'], inplace=True)

            # Casting this entire dataframe into Integer
            # df_5_temp.apply(p.to_numeric)

            print('Info::')
            print(df_5.info())
            print("*" * 60)
            print(df_5.describe())
            print("*" * 60)

            clog.logr('9.df_8' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_5, subdir)

            print('Intermediate Sample Dataframe for Age::')
            print(df_5.head())

            # Plotting it to Graph
            sns.jointplot(x="Age", y='Survived', data=df_5)
            sns.jointplot(x="Age", y='Survived', data=df_5, kind='kde', color='red')
            plt.xlabel("Age")
            plt.ylabel("Data Point (0 - Died   Vs    1 - Alive)")

            # Another check with Age Group
            sns.countplot(x='Survived', hue='Age', data=df_5, palette='RdBu_r')
            plt.xlabel("Survived(0 - Died   Vs    1 - Alive)")
            plt.ylabel("Total No Of Patient")

            df_6 = df_5.drop(columns=['Survived'], axis=1)

            clog.logr('10.df_9' + var + '.csv', Ind, df_6, subdir)

            # Train & Split Data
            x_1 = df_6
            y_1 = df_5['Survived']

            # Now Train-Test Split of your source data
            from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

            # test_size => % of allocated data for your test cases
            # random_state => A specific set of random split on your data
            X_train_1, X_test_1, Y_train_1, Y_test_1 = train_test_split(x_1, y_1, test_size=0.3, random_state=101)

            # Importing Model
            from sklearn.linear_model import LogisticRegression

            logmodel = LogisticRegression()
            logmodel.fit(X_train_1, Y_train_1)

            # Adding Predictions to it
            predictions_1 = logmodel.predict(X_test_1)

            from sklearn.metrics import classification_report

            print('Classification Report:: ')
            print(classification_report(Y_test_1, predictions_1))

            from sklearn.metrics import confusion_matrix

            print('Confusion Matrix:: ')
            print(confusion_matrix(Y_test_1, predictions_1))

            # This is require when you are trying to print from conventional
            # front & not using Jupyter notebook.
            plt.show()

            return 0

        except Exception  as e:
            x = str(e)
            print('Error : ', x)

            return 1

Key snippets from the above script –

df_2_Mod['ActiveCases'] = df_2_Mod.apply(lambda row: self.setDefaultActiveCases(row), axis=1)
df_2_Mod['ExposureStatus'] = df_2_Mod.apply(lambda row: self.setDefaultExposure(row), axis=1)
df_2_Mod['Gender'] = df_2_Mod.apply(lambda row: self.setGender(row), axis=1)

# Filtering all other records where we don't get any relevant information
# Fetching Data for
df_3 = df_2_Mod[(df_2_Mod['age_group'] != 'Not Reported')]

# Dropping unwanted columns
df_3.drop(columns=['exposure'], inplace=True)
df_3.drop(columns=['case_status'], inplace=True)
df_3.drop(columns=['date_reported'], inplace=True)
df_3.drop(columns=['gender'], inplace=True)

# Renaming one existing column
df_3.rename(columns={"age_group": "AgeGroup"}, inplace=True)

# Creating important feature
# 0 - Deceased
# 1 - Alive
df_3['Survived'] = df_3.apply(lambda row: self.setSurviveStatus(row), axis=1)

The above lines point to the critical transformation areas, where the application is invoking various essential business logic.

Let’s see at this moment our sample data –

6. 4_4_mod

Let’s look into the following part –

# Fixing Spread Columns
spread = p.get_dummies(df_4['ExposureStatus'], drop_first=True)
df_5 = p.concat([df_4, spread], axis=1)

The above lines will transform the data into this –

7. 5_5_Mod

As you can see, we’ve transformed the row values into columns with binary values. This kind of transformation is beneficial.

# Plotting it to Graph
sns.jointplot(x="Age", y='Survived', data=df_5)
sns.jointplot(x="Age", y='Survived', data=df_5, kind='kde', color='red')
plt.xlabel("Age")
plt.ylabel("Data Point (0 - Died   Vs    1 - Alive)")

# Another check with Age Group
sns.countplot(x='Survived', hue='Age', data=df_5, palette='RdBu_r')
plt.xlabel("Survived(0 - Died   Vs    1 - Alive)")
plt.ylabel("Total No Of Patient")

The above lines will process the data & visualize based on that.

x_1 = df_6
y_1 = df_5['Survived']

In the above snippet, we’ve assigned the features & target variable for our final logistic regression model.

# Now Train-Test Split of your source data
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

# test_size => % of allocated data for your test cases
# random_state => A specific set of random split on your data
X_train_1, X_test_1, Y_train_1, Y_test_1 = train_test_split(x_1, y_1, test_size=0.3, random_state=101)

# Importing Model
from sklearn.linear_model import LogisticRegression

logmodel = LogisticRegression()
logmodel.fit(X_train_1, Y_train_1)

In the above snippet, we’re splitting the primary data & create a set of test & train data. Once we have the collection, the application will put the logistic regression model. And, finally, we’ll fit the training data.

# Adding Predictions to it
predictions_1 = logmodel.predict(X_test_1)

from sklearn.metrics import classification_report

print('Classification Report:: ')
print(classification_report(Y_test_1, predictions_1))

The above lines, finally use the model & then we feed our test data.

Let’s see how it runs –

5.1.Run_Windows
5.2. Run_Windows

And, here is the log directory –

4. Logs

For better understanding, I’m just clubbing both the diagram at one place & the final outcome is showing as follows –

1. MergeReport

So, from the above picture, we can see that the maximum vulnerable patients are patients who are 80+. The next two categories that also suffered are 70+ & 60+.

Also, We’ve checked the Female Vs. Male in the following code –

sns.countplot(x='Survived', hue='Female', data=df_5, palette='RdBu_r')
plt.xlabel("Survived(0 - Died   Vs    1 - Alive)")
plt.ylabel("Female Vs Male (Including Other Genders)")

And, the analysis represents through this –

8. Female_Male

In this case, you have to consider that the Male part includes all the other genders apart from the actual Male. Hence, I believe death for females would be more compared to people who identified themselves as males.

So, finally, we’ve done it.

During this challenging time, I would request you to follow strict health guidelines & stay healthy.

N.B.: All the data that are used here can be found in the public domain. We use this solely for educational purposes. You can find the details here.

Analyzing Language using IBM Watson using Python

Hi Guys,

Today, I’ll be discussing the following topic – “How to analyze text using IBM Watson implementing through Python.”

IBM has significantly improved in the field of Visual Image Analysis or Text language analysis using its IBM Watson cloud platform. In this particular topic, we’ll be exploring the natural languages only.

To access IBM API, we need to first create an IBM Cloud account from this site.

Let us quickly go through the steps to create the IBM Language Understanding service. Click the Catalog on top of your browser menu as shown in the below picture –

6. Creating an Instance for Watson

After that, click the AI option on your left-hand side of the panel marked in RED.

Click the Watson-Studio & later choose the plan. In our case, We’ll select the “Lite” option as IBM provided this platform for all the developers to explore their cloud for free.

7. Choosing AI
8. Choosing Plan

Clicking the create option will lead to a blank page of Watson Studio as shown below –

9. Choosing Watson Studio

And, now, we need to click the Get Started button to launch it. This will lead to Create Project page, which can be done using the following steps –

10. Create Project Initial Screen

Now, clicking the create a project will lead you to the next screen –

11. Create Project - Continue

You can choose either an empty project, or you can create it from a sample file. In this case, we’ll be selecting the first option & this will lead us to the below page –

12. Creating a Project

And, then you will click the “Create” option, which will lead you to the next screen –

13. Adding to project

Now, you need to click “Add to Project.” This will give you a variety of services that you want to explore/use from the list. If you want to create your own natural language classifier, which you can do that as follows –

14. Adding Natural Language Components from IBM Cloud

Once, you click it – you need to select the associate service –

15. Adding Associte Service - Sound

Here, you need to click the hyperlink, which prompts to the next screen –

16. Choosing Associate Service - Sound

You need to check the price for both the Visual & Natural Language Classifier. They are pretty expensive. The visual classifier has the Lite plan. However, it has limitations of output.

Clicking the “Create” will prompt to the next screen –

18. Selecting Region - Sound

After successful creation, you will be redirected to the following page –

19. Landing Page - Sound

Now, We’ll be adding our “Natural Language Understand” for our test –

29. Choosing Natural Language Understanding

This will prompt the next screen –

7. Choosing AI - Natural Language Understanding

Once, it is successful. You will see the service registered as shown below –

3. Watson Services - Sound

If you click the service marked in RED, it will lead you to another page, where you will get the API Key & Url. You need both of this information in Python application to access this API as shown below –

4. Watson API Details - Sound

Now, we’re ready with the necessary cloud set-up. After this, we need to install the Python package for IBM Cloud as shown below –

1. Installing_Packages

We’ve noticed that, recently, IBM has launched one upgraded package. Hence, we installed that one as well. I would recommend you to install this second package directly instead of the first one shown above –

2. Installing Latest IBM_Watson Package

Now, we’re done with our set-up.

Let’s see the directory structure –

31. Directory Structure

We’ll be discussing only the main calling script & class script. However, we’ll be posting the parameters without discussing it. And, we won’t discuss clsL.py as we’ve already discussed that in our previous post.

1. clsConfig.py (This script contains all the parameter details.)

##############################################
#### Written By: SATYAKI DE               ####
#### Written On: 04-Apr-2020              ####
####                                      ####
#### Objective: This script is a config   ####
#### file, contains all the keys for      ####
#### IBM Cloud API.   Application will    ####
#### process these information & perform  ####
#### various analysis on IBM Watson cloud.####
##############################################

import os
import platform as pl

class clsConfig(object):
    Curr_Path = os.path.dirname(os.path.realpath(__file__))

    os_det = pl.system()
    if os_det == "Windows":
        sep = '\\'
    else:
        sep = '/'

    config = {
        'APP_ID': 1,
        'SERVICE_URL': "https://api.eu-gb.natural-language-understanding.watson.cloud.ibm.com/instances/xxxxxxxxxxxxxxXXXXXXXXXXxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx",
        'API_KEY': "Xxxxxxxxxxxxxkdkdfifd984djddkkdkdkdsSSdkdkdd",
        'API_TYPE': "application/json",
        'CACHE': "no-cache",
        'CON': "keep-alive",
        'ARCH_DIR': Curr_Path + sep + 'arch' + sep,
        'PROFILE_PATH': Curr_Path + sep + 'profile' + sep,
        'LOG_PATH': Curr_Path + sep + 'log' + sep,
        'REPORT_PATH': Curr_Path + sep + 'report',
        'SRC_PATH': Curr_Path + sep + 'Src_File' + sep,
        'APP_DESC_1': 'IBM Watson Language Understand!',
        'DEBUG_IND': 'N',
        'INIT_PATH': Curr_Path
    }

Note that you will be placing your API_KEY & URL here, as shown in the configuration file.

2. clsIBMWatson.py (This is the main script, which will invoke the IBM Watson API based on the input from the user & return 0 if successful.)

##############################################
#### Written By: SATYAKI DE               ####
#### Written On: 04-Apr-2020              ####
#### Modified On 04-Apr-2020              ####
####                                      ####
#### Objective: Main scripts to invoke    ####
#### IBM Watson Language Understand API.  ####
##############################################

import logging
from clsConfig import clsConfig as cf
import clsL as cl
import json
from ibm_watson import NaturalLanguageUnderstandingV1
from ibm_cloud_sdk_core.authenticators import IAMAuthenticator
from ibm_watson.natural_language_understanding_v1 import Features, EntitiesOptions, KeywordsOptions, SentimentOptions, CategoriesOptions, ConceptsOptions
from ibm_watson import ApiException

class clsIBMWatson:
    def __init__(self):
        self.api_key =  cf.config['API_KEY']
        self.service_url = cf.config['SERVICE_URL']

    def calculateExpressionFromUrl(self, inputUrl, inputVersion):
        try:
            api_key = self.api_key
            service_url = self.service_url
            print('-' * 60)
            print('Beginning of the IBM Watson for Input Url.')
            print('-' * 60)

            authenticator = IAMAuthenticator(api_key)

            # Authentication via service credentials provided in our config files
            service = NaturalLanguageUnderstandingV1(version=inputVersion, authenticator=authenticator)
            service.set_service_url(service_url)

            response = service.analyze(
                url=inputUrl,
                features=Features(entities=EntitiesOptions(),
                                  sentiment=SentimentOptions(),
                                  concepts=ConceptsOptions())).get_result()

            print(json.dumps(response, indent=2))

            return 0

        except ApiException as ex:
            print('-' * 60)
            print("Method failed for Url with status code " + str(ex.code) + ": " + ex.message)
            print('-' * 60)

            return 1

    def calculateExpressionFromText(self, inputText, inputVersion):
        try:
            api_key = self.api_key
            service_url = self.service_url
            print('-' * 60)
            print('Beginning of the IBM Watson for Input Url.')
            print('-' * 60)

            authenticator = IAMAuthenticator(api_key)

            # Authentication via service credentials provided in our config files
            service = NaturalLanguageUnderstandingV1(version=inputVersion, authenticator=authenticator)
            service.set_service_url(service_url)

            response = service.analyze(
                text=inputText,
                features=Features(entities=EntitiesOptions(),
                                  sentiment=SentimentOptions(),
                                  concepts=ConceptsOptions())).get_result()

            print(json.dumps(response, indent=2))

            return 0

        except ApiException as ex:
            print('-' * 60)
            print("Method failed for Url with status code " + str(ex.code) + ": " + ex.message)
            print('-' * 60)

            return 1

Some of the key lines from the above snippet –

authenticator = IAMAuthenticator(api_key)

# Authentication via service credentials provided in our config files
service = NaturalLanguageUnderstandingV1(version=inputVersion, authenticator=authenticator)
service.set_service_url(service_url)

By providing the API Key & Url, the application is initiating the service for Watson.

response = service.analyze(
    url=inputUrl,
    features=Features(entities=EntitiesOptions(),
                      sentiment=SentimentOptions(),
                      concepts=ConceptsOptions())).get_result()

Based on your type of input, it will bring the features of entities, sentiment & concepts here. Apart from that, you can additionally check the following features as well – Keywords & Categories.

3. callIBMWatsonAPI.py (This is the first calling script. Based on user choice, it will receive input either as Url or as the plain text & then analyze it.)

##############################################
#### Written By: SATYAKI DE               ####
#### Written On: 04-Apr-2020              ####
#### Modified On 04-Apr-2020              ####
####                                      ####
#### Objective: Main calling scripts.     ####
##############################################

from clsConfig import clsConfig as cf
import clsL as cl
import logging
import datetime
import clsIBMWatson as cw

# Disbling Warning
def warn(*args, **kwargs):
    pass

import warnings
warnings.warn = warn

# Lookup functions from
# Azure cloud SQL DB

var = datetime.datetime.now().strftime("%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S")

def main():
    try:
        ret_1 = 0
        general_log_path = str(cf.config['LOG_PATH'])

        # Enabling Logging Info
        logging.basicConfig(filename=general_log_path + 'IBMWatson_NaturalLanguageAnalysis.log', level=logging.INFO)

        # Initiating Log Class
        l = cl.clsL()

        # Moving previous day log files to archive directory
        log_dir = cf.config['LOG_PATH']
        curr_ver =datetime.datetime.now().strftime("%Y-%m-%d")

        tmpR0 = "*" * 157

        logging.info(tmpR0)
        tmpR9 = 'Start Time: ' + str(var)
        logging.info(tmpR9)
        logging.info(tmpR0)

        print("Log Directory::", log_dir)
        tmpR1 = 'Log Directory::' + log_dir
        logging.info(tmpR1)

        print('Welcome to IBM Wantson Language Understanding Calling Program: ')
        print('-' * 60)
        print('Please Press 1 for Understand the language from Url.')
        print('Please Press 2 for Understand the language from your input-text.')
        input_choice = int(input('Please provide your choice:'))

        # Create the instance of the IBM Watson Class
        x2 = cw.clsIBMWatson()

        # Let's pass this to our map section
        if input_choice == 1:
            textUrl = str(input('Please provide the complete input url:'))
            ret_1 = x2.calculateExpressionFromUrl(textUrl, curr_ver)
        elif input_choice == 2:
            inputText = str(input('Please provide the input text:'))
            ret_1 = x2.calculateExpressionFromText(inputText, curr_ver)
        else:
            print('Invalid options!')

        if ret_1 == 0:
            print('Successful IBM Watson Language Understanding Generated!')
        else:
            print('Failed to generate IBM Watson Language Understanding!')

        print("-" * 60)
        print()

        print('Finding Analysis points..')
        print("*" * 157)
        logging.info('Finding Analysis points..')
        logging.info(tmpR0)


        tmpR10 = 'End Time: ' + str(var)
        logging.info(tmpR10)
        logging.info(tmpR0)

    except ValueError as e:
        print(str(e))
        print("Invalid option!")
        logging.info("Invalid option!")

    except Exception as e:
        print("Top level Error: args:{0}, message{1}".format(e.args, e.message))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

This script is pretty straight forward as it is first creating an instance of the main class & then based on the user input, it is calling the respective functions here.

As of now, IBM Watson can work on a list of languages, which are available here.

If you want to start from scratch, please refer to the following link.

Please find the screenshot of our application run –

Case 1 (With Url): 

21. Win_Run_1_Url
23. Win_Run_3_Url

Case 2 (With Plain text):

25. Win_Run_1_InputText
26. Win_Run_2_InputText
27. Win_Run_3_InputText

Now, Don’t forget to delete all the services from your IBM Cloud.

32. Delete Service

As you can see, from the service, you need to delete all the services one-by-one as shown in the figure.

So, we’ve done it.

To explore my photography, you can visit the following link.

I’ll be posting another new post in the coming days. Till then, Happy Avenging! 😀

Note: All the data posted here are representational data & available over the internet & for educational purpose only.